Brittany, one of our forensic interviewers, pointed out an article that she thought elucidated some of the mystery behind what it is, precisely, that forensic interviewers do. Written by Elizabeth King, a forensic interviewer at Randolph-Tucker CAC in West Virginia, the article explains how the interviewer has to be an expert improvisor, ensuring a constant balance between the needs of the MDT and the needs of the child, all while maintaining their essential integrity and neutrality.

As an organization with a vested interest in the health and well-being of our community, we’re always on the lookout for opportunities to spread our message to new people. We’re so excited that one such opportunity has developed not far from our facility at Fork n’ Pint in Waterford, where they’ve introduced a charity pint benefiting CARE House! For every pint they sell of Norm’s Raggedy A** IPA by Griffin Claw Brewing Company, Fork n’ Pint will donate $1 to CARE House.

As mentioned previously, each survivor’s reaction to abuse will vary, which causes the kinds of treatments available to be very diverse in their uses. After experiencing CSA, the process through which an individual may begin to cope with that trauma will vary from person to person. However, it is possible to identify common themes in the initial coping mechanisms of survivors of CSA. It is also possible to recognize common repercussions of the same or similar types of abuse (e.g.